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Author Topic: Tightening the Action Screws on a T3  (Read 2163 times)

ShtrRdy

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Tightening the Action Screws on a T3
« on: February 20, 2012, 07:28:28 PM »

I spoke with a Beretta Tech Support guy last week to ask him what the proper procedure was for tightening the Action Screws on a T3 rifle.  He said to first line up the Recoil Lug in the stock to the cutout in the Receiver.  Then thread in the Reciever/Action screw and Tang screw and lightly snug these up.  He said you should be able to tell if you have the Recoil Lug in the right place during this step.  Next, he said to hold the gun muzzle up and tap the butt of the stock on the ground a few times to get the Receiver to seat against the Recoil Lug.  While it's seated in it's furthest back position, tighten the front screw first to 51 to 52 in-lb, then tighten the back screw to the same torque.

I've never taken mine apart yet so I don't know how the whole Recoil Lug thing works. 
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crowslayer17

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Re: Tightening the Action Screws on a T3
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2013, 04:40:45 PM »

Is the torque the same for wood and synthetic stocks?
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yukonal

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Re: Tightening the Action Screws on a T3
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2013, 05:28:16 PM »

It's the same for the front and back.

There is NO need to torque the action screws any tighter than 35 inch pounds. Especially the wood stocks.

I torque all my stocks, even the pillar bedded, synthetic stocks, to 35 inch pounds.
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I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once, as I ever was.

Kaindog45

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Re: Tightening the Action Screws on a T3
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2013, 06:53:09 PM »

Tikka addressed this question under the FAQ section on their website at one point.  The answer was that there wasn't a torque spec for the action screws, just keep them "tight".

I'm a firm believer in consistency and believe in torque spec(s), but I trust what they say since they make them... not just distribute them like their owner (Beretta)

I own three T3's right now, all stainless Lite models in 6.5x55, .30-06 and .338 win mag.  I've taken the stocks off all three after they were sighted in and "tightened" (not torqued) the screws during reassembly without any issue.  There may have been a slight shift in impact but nothing horrid or opening of groups.

Maybe I just got lucky with mine and maybe there really is a torque spec, but I think you can do far worse by under tightening or over tightening than just keeping them "tight".
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yukonal

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Re: Tightening the Action Screws on a T3
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2013, 06:04:01 PM »



I'm a firm believer in consistency and believe in torque spec(s).

Maybe I just got lucky with mine and maybe there really is a torque spec, but I think you can do far worse than just keeping them "tight".


So, which is it?.................Thanks for the advice.
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I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once, as I ever was.

Kaindog45

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Re: Tightening the Action Screws on a T3
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2013, 09:56:53 PM »

Tikka's answer was that there isn't a spec.  In regards to the partial quote of mine you posted... I believe in using a spec when they exist.  Since they haven't specified one, then one doesn't exist.  You seem to have luck using 35 inch lbs.... maybe that's an unofficial spec that works across the board and maybe it isn't.  Could be 40 or 45 etc. or even vary from gun to gun.  I'll give it a try on mine and see what happens.  If it works then that's fine by me.

You miss quoted me on the second part of your last post.

..."I think you can do far worse by under tightening or over tightening than just keeping them "tight".
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