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Author Topic: Tikka 595 6XC  (Read 5328 times)

shooter65

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Tikka 595 6XC
« on: January 19, 2012, 08:06:35 AM »

6XC Bartlein Barrel 8 twist with JC custom brake
Master Sporter stock upgraded by MT Guns














10 shots at 200 yards

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yukonal

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2012, 10:06:01 PM »

That's some serious eye candy there! Good shootin'.
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I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once, as I ever was.

shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2012, 10:03:18 AM »

Thanks. Just got 300 Berger 105 Hybrids to try out at 1k.
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yukonal

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2012, 08:00:00 PM »

I googled J C custom muzzle brake and didn't find anything. How about a link? Thanks.
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I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once, as I ever was.

shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2012, 09:17:23 AM »

From yesterday. 50 shooters. 4200 feet in elevation. As always....very windy!
22 moa to 1k. 115 DTAC's. 39.6 gr. of H4350.



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shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2012, 10:03:00 AM »

I googled J C custom muzzle brake and didn't find anything. How about a link? Thanks.



Jason Christian
817-504-1637

 jchristian1637@gmail.com
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Jason_McHann

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2012, 12:46:25 PM »

That is some excellent shooting!

shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2012, 04:56:35 PM »

That is some excellent shooting!

Thanks.
 I started out at 21.5 moa and realized my shots were going low. Dialed in 22 moa and ran all 10's and X's. Oh well.....next time!
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Jason_McHann

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2012, 05:06:11 PM »

It's amazing to see how those DTacs perform.

Most guys think they need to go bigger to shoot further when all they need to do use a high bc bullet in a well built gun.

Keep us posted on how the next shoot goes.

By the way, what trigger are you using?

shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2012, 07:50:50 AM »

The trigger is a stock Tikka 595. I am always amazed to see the amount of money spent on large magnums, 408's and 50's and they get beat by the 6's and 6.5's consistently. Bigger is not better in this case.

Next match will be at Camp Pendleton and I will be using the new Berger 105 Hybrids.
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ShtrRdy

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2012, 07:00:28 PM »

Very nice hooter65!  If you get some time, would you mind writing up a description of your prone position and technique for us? 
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shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2012, 05:51:10 PM »

When it comes to shooting, I like to use the K.I.S.S principle.

I use a Sinclair bipod, a Protecktor rear bag filled with heavy sand.
http://protektormodel.com/DrBag.htm

While in the prone position, I am directly behind the the rifle. Never off at an angle.
Trigger pull -  finger is on the trigger at 90 degrees and gently  "squeeze the trigger" straight back.
Head stays on the rifle for complete follow through of the shot. And most important of all is our favorite enemy which is the wind...



Wind:

Wind defection is non- deterministic element, and is the mot difficult challenge for all types of long range shooting.

Wind is air in motion; a fluid. Fluids have a nasty habit of being chaotic and difficult to predict in general.

Wind is not a constant textbook 10 mph crosswind, but a real world wind complete with velocity gradient, direction changes, eddies, pick-ups, let-offs, vertical components, etc.

Since you canít reliably measure and account for wind deflection, the best you can do is minimize its uncertainty and it effects. This is the best technical approach to dealing with the wind problem.
There are two major things you can do to minimize the effects of wind:
1.   Practice reading your wind skills; by observing the cause and effect relationship between the wind conditions and bullet deflection.
2.   If you can obtain a real insight of how wind deflection works, you can make smart decisions about your equipment (rifle/bullet) that result in superior ballistics in the form of minimal wind deflection.

With a right hand twist rifle:
1.   Wind from the left will deflect a bullet to the right and down.
2.   Wind form the right will deflect a bullet to the left and up.

Wind Gradient:
Wind gradient refers to the tendency for air currents to move more swiftly farther off the ground. Even on a windy day, when you get right down in the dirt and weeds, there is essentially no wind. However, if you were to sample the wind 10 feet above the ground, you would find an even higher wind speed. Depending on the terrain, the wind may reach full speed at high or low altitude. In general, the smoother the ground is, (i.e.) a frozen lake or flat desert, the less altitude is required for the wind to develop its full velocity. On the contrary, if the ground is covered with this weeds, grass, shrubs, trees, etc, the wind may not reach full speed until a much higher altitude.
As the bullet arcs along itís trajectory toward a distant target, it will rise, 10,15, even 20 feet above the ground and sometimes more than that if the shot goes over the valley. In that case, the bullet can be flying thru a wind speed thatís far greater than the shooter is able to sample from his position, or observe on the ground near the targetsí location.

Beating the wind:

Wind deflection is the most influential non-deterministic element in long range ballistics.

The best strategy for beating the uncertainty of wind deflection is to minimize its uncertainty and its effects.

Lag time is the fundamental measure of merit for wind deflection. Lag time is reduced by using high BC bullets and high muzzle velocity.

In a trade Ė off between low BC ( light weight) bullets at high speed compared to high BC ( heavy) bullets at reduced speed, the high BC bullets at lower speed will produce less lag time and wind deflection.

The academic debate between near wind and far wind is trumped by the unique realities of wind pattern to each specific range. The best policy for shooting in the wind is flexibility and critical assessment of the features unique to each range.

Wind does not blow on the side of the bullet to cause deflection. Instead, the bullet weathervanes into the oncoming airflow. A crosswind will make the bullet fly at a small angle to the line of sight. The aerodynamic drag applied to the bullet acts directly back along the bullet axis, which effectively pulls it away from the line of sight.

Wind gradient is when the wind velocity increases with increased height above the ground. It can be difficult to judge the wind speed high above the ground when shooting over valleys where there are no indicators, but you can usually count on higher velocity winds in such cases.

Cross wind weighting factors can be used to calculate the effects of multiple winds. The most wind sensitive portion of a bulletís trajectory is not always the first segment. If the bullet will go transonic during its flight, that will dictate where the bullet is most sensitive.

Aerodynamic jump is a mechanism by which a bullet can have a vertical deflection when fired into a purely horizontal crosswind speed. This deflection is a constant angular deflection, roughly equal to .03 to .04 moa per mph of crosswind speed, and it depends on the gyroscopic stability of the bullet at the muzzle. The deflection is down for a left Ė right crosswind, and up for a right to left crosswind. These directions are reversed for a left twist barrel.

Point forward flight means that the nose of the bullet is always pointed straight into the oncoming air flow like a weather vane. Now the axis of the bullet is no longer aligned with the line of sight. Arrows are stabilized with fletching, and bullets are stabilized with spin, the both point their nose into the oncoming air flow when they are stable in flight.

For a given range and atmospheric condition, lag time and wind deflection depend on muzzle velocity and BC.


In general, a headwind will cause a bullet to slowdown faster and strike the target lower and vice versa for a tail wind.


Mirage:

Reading Mirage
by Gail McMillan
Copyright © Gail McMillan. Used with permission of McMillan Fiberglass Stocks.

What are those squiggly little things I see running along the top of my target frame? Or what is mirage and how do I cope with it?

The problem of mirage haunts every shooter regardless of experience. Mirage is the culprit when you have a four shot group that looks like one bullet hole and the fifth shot shows up a half inch away. He's the same guy that directs the bullet to the 8 ring when all the rest are in the x ring. There are a lot of wrong ideas about mirage among the different shooting disciplines. Some shooters can ignore it completely; pistol shooters fall into this category. High Power competitors believe it's the wind that does all the damage and mirage is just an indication of which way the wind is blowing, at very long ranges it is a combination of both wind and mirage that affects accuracy. If all you are trying to do is hold 2 minutes of angle you don't need the information that follows. If, on the other hand, you want to shoot better than 1/2 MOA you need to learn to deal with mirage. I am not writing this to put anyone down, I am just reporting what I have learned from nearly a half a century of competition and what has worked for me. If you disagree with me so be it but I am too old to change my ideas and methods so I don't invite arguments.

First what is mirage? To answer that you need to take a glass full of water and put a spoon in it. Look at how the spoon handle appears to bend at the point it enters the water. This is an illusion caused by the difference in the index of refraction of air and water. The variation of air temperature between you and the target causes a change in the index of refraction of the air along your sight path. This bends the light causing the image of the target to be in a different place than the actual target. If you set your rifle in a solid rest, aim it at a target and sit and watch you will see the target appear to dance around under the crosshairs, obviously the target is not moving, it is the image that is moving. What you need to be able to do is determine by watching the mirage where the target is in relation to its image. It is essential that you be able to look at the running mirage and feel confident that you know exactly where the bullet will go when you touch it off. Imagine that you are on the last shot of the match and you have it won going away, time is running out, when conditions switch from lazy right to left mirage to a fast running left to right mirage at a forty five degree angle. You must have confidence in your judgment to hold where you know the target is in relation to the image you are watching and know that your last round will fall in the group. You can't think, "well I think it is over here two inches but I will play it safe and hold one inch". If you do that you are admitting defeat by accepting a one-inch group. You must fully accept the fact that the mirage is moving the image while the target is standing still and go for it.

It is a common fault of young shooters who don't have confidence in their judgment to think that they can wait out conditions and shoot in the same condition each time. It can't be done. It is impossible to remember all of the different variables (position of several wind flags, breeze on the back of your neck, mirage intensity and direction, density of clouds, etc.) for the 5 to 10 minutes it takes to complete a group.

What I hope to accomplish with this article is to tell you the method of training you can use to gain the confidence in your ability to look at a condition and know it is worth x amount and be totally confident that if you hold for the conditions your shot will go right in the group. No one can dope it right every time but it is the champions who get it right the most. Any one with a little practice can look down range and tell the difference in conditions that will cause an inch of difference in the point of impact. To be a champion you must be able to detect a change that will move the point of impact a half a bullet hole.

Step one is to zero your rifle in ideal conditions. That might mean getting up at five in the morning and getting to the range while it is cool and calm and get the rifle to print right beneath the cross hairs. If your scope has adjustable knobs set them at zero so you know where it is hitting under perfect conditions. The next thing you will need is a couple of wind flags. No they are not to tell how much the wind is blowing your bullet. They are to tell you what angle the mirage is running at. The angle the mirage is running has an effect on where it's moving the image. For example the mirage is running at what looks like right to left at a certain speed. You would assume that it is moving the image to the left, which it is, but it may be running at an angle of 40 degrees down range at the same time. Knowing this you can assume it will not be moving the image quite as far to the left as you first thought, also, because it is running away from you it is pushing the image lower. Your challenge is to determine how far to the left and how far up to hold. One old rule is never ever shoot in a boil. That's pretty sound advice but how do you tell a boil from mirage that is running straight away or towards you, the answer, practice. While boiling mirage and running mirage look similar they will cause distinctly different movement of the image, one is raising the image and the other is pushing it down. During this exercise try to pick as many different conditions as possible so that you can learn what each condition will do.

You have a rifle that we know is hitting right under the cross hairs in ideal conditions and hopefully it will shoot Ĺ moa or better. It's hard to learn much if you can't trust the rifle. You have a good pedestal, sandbag and, if possible, a good spotting scope. A pair of wind flags set up at intervals down range. The afternoon is getting warm and your target frame looks like there are a bunch of mice feet running back and forth on top of it. You have brought a tablet and a pencil to take notes with. You write down the conditions as you see them and then mark where you think the bullet will hit on the target (in the beginning this is just a guess). Now it is time to test your judgment, you take a dead-on hold and fire one round . You look at the target and then at your tablet and see how far you were off and mark your actual impact point in relation to the sketch you drew. Repeat the process again, sketch the target, mark where you think you will hit, load one round, take a dead-on hold and see where you hit. Be sure that you describe the conditions in as much detail as you can. As an example: rt. to lt. at moderate rate wind flag indicates 30 degree down range. It will take a little time to record the conditions, your guess and the actual impact point but this is time well spent, it will give you a chance to study your practice session in the evening and reflect on what you have learned. At this point shooting groups is a waste of time and ammo. Remember not to change your scope from where it was in ideal conditions. You can follow this routine as long as you want or until you are hitting right where you marked every time.

Now you are at the range and are ready to take the nest step. Continue to observe the conditions and make a note of them but instead of taking a dead-on hold from now on you are going to figure where the target really is and hold off of the target image so that you will impact in the x ring. Take a shot and see where you hit. Mark your tablet and repeat. If you are accurate in your reading of the mirage and description of it and you take good notes you will be able to study your notes when you're not at the range and pick up things you might have missed while you were shooting. To make it easier and quicker you can develop a shorthand way to record information, I draw the waves of mirage large and widely spaced for slow mirage and smaller and shorter as the mirage speed increases. The purpose of this exercise is to reinforce your confidence that the mirage is doing what you know it is.

A word about practice, there is a point in practice when it stops accomplishing anything and all you are doing is going through the motions. At this point it is a waste of time and does more harm than good. It is much better to quit while you are fresh and sharp than keep it up until you are past prime. You have proceeded through steps one and two and by now you have a good idea where the target really is under most mirage conditions. It is a good idea to repeat both steps the first thing when getting to the range or when you shoot at a new range as it will reinforce your confidence and in the case of a strange range it will point out any peculiar traits of the range. The saying "hometown advantage" definitely applies to shooting, each range has its own subtle characteristics the homeboys have learned, a little time spent going back to the basics might reduce the "hometown advantage". I will finish this off as though you were going to shoot benchrest competition because it covers shooting groups. By now you are able to judge conditions and you know what is necessary to put the bullet where you want it to go. Now instead of shooting singles you are going to shoot groups. As you probably know in benchrest competition you have a record target and a sighter target. You are allowed unlimited shots on the sighter target and can go back and forth between the record target and sighter target. While you are waiting for the "commence firing" command put the time to good use and study the conditions for as long as you can to determine what the prevailing conditions are.

After the commence fire command wait until the prevailing conditions are running before you start. Shoot your first record shot with a dead-on hold and note where the shot went in relation to the conditions (some rifles require one or more fouling shots before they settle down so it's a good idea to fire a couple of shots into the sighter target first). Remember that you have your bullets printing right under your crosshair so when you fire the first shot it becomes your target, the location of your group in a benchrest match is unimportant so it is not necessary to try to put your first shot in the x ring. Now all you are shooting is a four shot group (because you are shooting at your first shot) while every one else is shooting five. This gives you an advantage right off the start. You watch conditions and determine where the target is (notice I said where the target is, not the image.) If conditions are changing fast you wont have time to go back to your sighter to verify what you think so you will have to go on guts. If the changes are slow then always go back to the sighter when you see a change and verify how much it is worth.

You will notice that I didn't tell you how to read mirage. If I had you wouldn't remember it till you got to the range. I hope I have given you some idea of how to train so that you know how to read it and you will remember it. I can't impress on you the importance in believing that your eyes are lying to you and that the target isn't really where you are seeing it .

There is a small trick that I have used that I will share with you. Your rifle scope is focused at the target and has a very shallow depth of field. That means that you are only seeing the mirage for a few feet at the target. The mirage can be running the opposite direction up range and you will never know it. If you stop down the objective lens by covering it and leaving a small hole in the center you will increase the depth of field and be able to see mirage over a larger area of the range. You can do this by using tape and leaving a hole in the center about the size of a dime.

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shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2012, 06:04:47 PM »

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ShtrRdy

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2012, 07:25:13 PM »

Thank you Sir!   I noticed your other posts on the technique sub forum.  I sure appreciate it  -  got some reading to do.   -   Todd
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shooter65

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Re: Tikka 595 6XC
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2012, 10:07:05 PM »


1. The Science Department, this is wind at the shooter, because this is the only place the shooter can judge the wind with any degree of certainty. All basis for judging the wind starts at the shooter, as experience grows so does how far out an experienced shooter can judge and understand the conditions. For new shooters you start your personal database for understanding the wind at you. No where else can you begin to understand the conditions. So, it is best to use a hand held device to verify your guess. This is reenforced visually by noting the conditions and indicators around you. Once that is done you can begin the journey towards the Art Department.

2. The Art Department is anything down range, mid, or at the target. This is never constant as wind does not flow in a straight line or in constant velocities, but rather fluctuates like waves on a beach, changing in velocity. Because it is invisible we try to down range indicators to determine it's speed, which is more easily read at the shooter. Again, as experience grows, you begin to recognize changes downrange which will effect the shot like Terrain features or the fact that mid range appears to be more important when really its just a function of the flight of bullet.

Max Ordinate is the term, which tells you the highest point of the bullet's flight. Because it is well over the line of sight this deceives a lot of shooters. Max ord for a 308 at 1000 yards is roughly 15ft over the line of sight. Because of this, the winds are stronger, in some cases quite a bit stronger because there is less resistance. This is important to understand, so if the shooters is doping a 1000 yard shot and the wind 12MPH at the shooter, it can easily be 16MPH at Max Ord... you can't see this, but it is there and happening. We see everyday. If I am shooting to 1000 yards with a 308 and I read the wind at me as 8MPH, I will instinctively dope the shot for 10MPH because I know it will be effected more because of the Max Ord. Inside ranges like 600 yards it is no longer an issue and I simply dope it for the velocity read at the shooter because the bullet is not traveling up as high.

Let no one fool you, anything down range is a guess, nothing more. You may have an educated guess and in my cases the guess maybe correct, but it starts at the shooter regardless of who it is. In winds under 10MPH it is easy to use things like Mirage, trees, or flags, etc... to help with that guess, but once you go beyond that velocity, anything above 10MPH to 12MPH all bets are off as those indicators are no longer as useful, the information gleaned at the shooter is much more important.

Terrain is another very important feature as this effects the winds velocity and effects on the bullet . I have seen a mirage in a valley running about 8MPH but because the mountains were blocking the flight of the bullet to the target below, the hold was actually no wind. At this past SHC there were more hits at 1000 than at 900 simply because of the terrain before each target. Terrain features can be seen or unseen by the shooter and still have enormous effects which, because wind is invisible the shooter will never see. Flags can be deceiving on a square range when being influenced by terrain. This will effect the flag and have no effect on the bullet. Also there are no flags in the field to use, so relying on them too heavily can have negative effects in the long run. This is why it is a guess downrange and nothing more, you have no way of knowing if there is some terrain feature between the target and the wind which will change it's velocity or direction of travel.

New shooters, build your library by doping the wind at you, as you grow as a shooter, you'll begin to extend that down range. But understand every class, when our winds are blowing 12MPH to 16MPH daily, I ask shooters, new and old alike to tell me what the wind is doing down range by looking at the grass or the trees and the answer is always the same, blowing.
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